RECOMMENDED APPROACH TO DEVELOPING A CIVIC RECREATION AND WELLNESS CENTRE –

APPLY AN EQUITY AND AFFORDABILITY LENS TO ALL STAGES OF DECISION-MAKING

Equity Framework For Use Within A Civic Context

Four Types of Equity

PROCEDURAL
(INCLUSION)

Inclusive, accessible, authentic engagement and representation in the process to develop or implement programs or policies.

INTERGENERATIONAL

Decisions consider generational impacts and do not result in unfair burdens on future generations.

DISTRIBUTIONAL
(ACCESS)

Programs and policies result in fair distributions of benefits and burdens across all segments of a community, prioritizing those with highest need.

STRUCTURAL

Decision-makers institutionalize accountability; decisions are made with a recognition of the historical, cultural, and institutional dynamics and structures that have routinely advantaged privileged groups in society and resulted in chronic, cumulative disadvantage for subordinated groups.

Municipal Equity Lens And Scorecard Tools

1.Use data to unearth root causes of income and wealth disparity and systemic inequities.

2.Develop a city-wide picture of who is being left behind (underserved, underrepresented, marginalized / ignored) in order to:

  • Inform policy of multiple
  • Guide investment decisions (capital investments, operating budgets, procurement and grants)
  • Distribute social services appropriately (defensible and therefore a smoother approval process)

3.Evaluate how existing policies and practices of local government can continue to perpetuate or begin to address neighbourhood and household level inequities by analyzing internal data such as:

  • the allocation of city operating budgets and historical, current, and proposed capital investments;
  • the distribution of City services and infrastructure,
  • who is accessing civic buildings, services, programs and grants, and
  • who is represented on city staff, council, and committees.

Social Benefits From Recreation And Physical Activity

Societal benefits extend well beyond physical health:

Psychological and social well-being

  • Better cognition, brain development, mental health for children

Increased civic pride

  • Community attachment, engagement and cohesion,
  • Reduction in racism, bigotry, violence, crime
  • Newcomers – a way to connect with their new community

Economic development and prosperity

  • equalization benefits for low-income households

”Durable by design”

  • more resilient and resistant to disease / chronic illness

Vastly improved early childhood developmental trajectories

Increased life expectancy overall

Reduced smoking rate for youth and adults

Global Best Practice (including BC Provincial directives) ask communities to incorporate an equity lens to “policies, programs, environments and practices in physical activity” in order to ensure truly universal access.

Benefits of more equitable and inclusive physical recreation are EXPONENTIAL for traditionally underserved populations who may feel “excluded” or experience barriers to access.

In Victoria, those folks are:

Women and girls

Indigenous Peoples

People of colour

persons with a disability

seniors

new Canadians – recent immigrants and refugees

members of the LGBTQ community

low income individuals and families

people with lower levels of formal education

Sport And Recreation Barriers And Strategies For:

INDIGENOUS PEOPLES

  • Cultural safety
  • Anti-racism framework
  • Traditional spaces – sweat lodge, elders lounge
  • Knowledge transfer
  • Reflection of values/ culture
  • Equity hiring
  • Community integration
  • Familiarity, comfort

NEWCOMERS